16th-century manuscript could rewrite australian history dvd

New Holland T8 tractors spark interest A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th-century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history. Trickett also suggests the Indigenous Australian name for the area may have Portuguese origins.

He speculated the images could come from a trip to Papua. Martin Woods of the National Library of Australia commented: MajorKeeper of Maps at the British Museumwho in first made significant efforts to prove the Portuguese discovered Australia before the Dutch.

The discovery was apparently forgotten again until anthropologist McIntosh got the ball rolling a few months ago. The European discovery of Australia has officially been credited to the Dutch voyage headed by Willen Janszoon inbut historians have suggested the country may already have been explored by other western Europeans.

Brunelle and Robert J. He will also be looking for a secret cave Aboriginal legends talk about. Should McIntosh and his team find what they are looking for, the find might not only be priceless treasure, but relics that could rewrite Australian history.

Advocates of the Portuguese discovery theory endeavour to explain away this Australian soldier Maurie Isenberg was stationed on one of the islands to man a radar station and spent his spare time fishing on the idyllic beaches.

How did year-old coins end up on a remote beach on an island off the northern coast of Australia? The case for an early Portuguese discovery of Australia rests entirely on imagined resemblances between the "continent" of Jave La Grande on the Dieppe maps and Australia.

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The Dieppe maps had no claimed sources, no "discoverer" of the land shown In the late s, mathematician Ian McKiggan developed his theory of exponential longitude error theory to explain discrepancies, [33] although he modified this position after a public exchange of opinion with W.

The decades from about to when the Dieppe school of cartographers flourished were also the period in which French trade with the New World was at its 16th-century height, in terms of the North Atlantic fish trade, the fur trade, and, most important for the cartographers, the rivalry with the Portuguese for control of the coasts of Brazil and the supplies of lucrative brazilwood.

Accordingly, Java Major, or Jave la Grande, was shown as a promontory of the undiscovered antarctic continent of Terra Australis.

Professor Edward Heawood also provided early criticism of the theory. Whatever it was, the wreck has not been seen since despite extensive searches in recent times.

Kangaroo in 400-year-old manuscript could change Australian history

McIntosh wants to answer some of these mysteries during his planned expedition to the Wessel Islands in July. He pointed out that "a difficulty arises from the necessity of supposing at least two separate voyages of discovery, one on each coast, though absolutely no record of any such exists".

Kangaroo drawing that could change Australian history

Image of what is thought to be a kangaroo on a 16th-century processional could lend weight to the theory that the Portuguese were the first explorers to set foot on Australian soil, before the Dutch or English. Which could cause waves as the European discovery of Australia has officially been credited to the Dutch voyage headed by Willen Janszoon inbut historians have suggested the country may already have been explored by other western Europeans.Ancient discovery set to rewrite Australian history By on May 19, with Comments 0 Five copper coins and a nearly year-old map with an ‘‘X’’ might lead to a discovery that could rewrite Australia’s history.

Discovery: An image of what is thought to be a kangaroo on a 16th century Processional could lend weight to the theory the Portuguese were the first explorers in Australia. Photo: Debbie Cuthbertson A tiny drawing of a kangaroo curled in the letters of a 16th century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history.

Could a New Discovered Manuscript Rewrite Australian History? For a long time there has been a theory that the Portuguese were the first to set foot upon Australian soil, long before the Dutch or the English.

A tiny drawing of a kangaroo discovered in a 16th century Portuguese manuscript could rewrite Australian history, experts say. The document, acquired by Les Enluminures Gallery in New York, shows a carefully-drawn sketch of a kangaroo (know as a “canguru” in Portuguese) in its text and is dated between and 16th-century manuscript could rewrite Australian history How to get high without drugs: Is hyperventilating your way into a trance using ‘holotropic breathwork’ the latest new age craze?

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